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Small Girls takes team bonding seriously, which is why instead of practicing your typical trust falls, we threw a slumber party! Complete with cocktails, s’mores, movies, massages, and a psychic. Wait, what? Here’s a recap of the #SGPRSlumberParty (you know you work in PR when your slumber party has an official hashtag)…

small girls pr

Did a company-wide lock in last weekend. Working with only my partner Bianca was cool for a year or two, but working with a dozen other crazy individuals alongside us… can’t beat it.

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Several years ago I was invited to speak at Utah State University about innovations in PR. I had a (self-appointed) student liaison who bought the entire audience props echoing @smallgirlspr campaigns to wear during my talk. I was impressed but even more so when she asked if she could drive me to the airport (getting in an extra 30 min of face time during which she told me about the cupcake shop’s social media she’d built from the ground up). It’s now the 2 year anniversary of convincing @anniegracej to hop on a plane to come work for us. We christened today “Annie Day” for the occasion, with Annie-themed office games, and had everyone in her life make her a card- cousins, friends, crushes and co-workers. Here’s a card one of our other employees made to celebrate. (at Small Girls PR HQ)

Several years ago I was invited to speak at Utah State University about innovations in PR. I had a (self-appointed) student liaison who bought the entire audience props echoing @smallgirlspr campaigns to wear during my talk. I was impressed but even more so when she asked if she could drive me to the airport (getting in an extra 30 min of face time during which she told me about the cupcake shop’s social media she’d built from the ground up). It’s now the 2 year anniversary of convincing @anniegracej to hop on a plane to come work for us. We christened today “Annie Day” for the occasion, with Annie-themed office games, and had everyone in her life make her a card- cousins, friends, crushes and co-workers. Here’s a card one of our other employees made to celebrate. (at Small Girls PR HQ)

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so hyped on day 1 at our new offices we’ve spent the past couple months building and loving into existence that I can’t rly sleep. We started 3 years ago with just two desks in a coworking space, and now have the first place that’s all our own, drenched in sunlight, complete with phone booth rooms, fur throws, candy jars, and filled with the 10 employees that make coming into work so god damned great in the first place. (at Small Girls PR HQ)

so hyped on day 1 at our new offices we’ve spent the past couple months building and loving into existence that I can’t rly sleep. We started 3 years ago with just two desks in a coworking space, and now have the first place that’s all our own, drenched in sunlight, complete with phone booth rooms, fur throws, candy jars, and filled with the 10 employees that make coming into work so god damned great in the first place. (at Small Girls PR HQ)

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I’m fascinated by the harem sweatpants trend. I think it cascaded nicely with the YOLO trend. Sweatpants to work are the sartorial expression of the YOLO generation.

Probably regrettably, Racked chose to interview me, along with some fashion notables, for their 2013 year in review. You can read the rest of my retail reflections throughout the series here.
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American Girl Magazine, 1997
My uncle is visiting my grandparents right now and stumbled upon this old American Girl Magazine I was featured in from the ’90s.
When I was about seven years old, I started a letter writing campaign to the Empire State Building asking them to change the lighting scheme to honor Hanukkah. That particular year, Hanukkah was in the beginning of December, but the city landmark was already illuminated red & green in anticipation of Christmas several weeks away.
I thought that was nuts so when I got home I grabbed a gel pen and pitched the building to change it. A polite manager mailed back a response declining the request. Frustrated, I asked my parents who owned the building and wrote another letter, this time up the chain.
About a year later, the owner was caught evading community service for her prior stint evading taxes. She had already been evading my letter for a while, so neither of these pieces of news surprised me. Around that time, however (in what I now assume was an effort to rally positive public opinion), I got a response from a publicist who said the owner was touched and they’d be not only honoring my request that year, but each year forever after. I was even invited to flip the inaugural switch! Within days, news crews were in my living room, outside my school, and inviting me to appear on shows such as Rosie O’Donnell (remember that show?)
The story had transcended the typical news cycle and began trickling into pop culture: I was invited to the Nickelodeon Kid’s Choice Awards, Howard Stern poked fun at me on air (though I was never a guest), and at one point we got a message from a Seinfeld producer saying the story was under consideration to be included in the season’s story line. 
This is probably when I realized not only that there was such a thing as a publicist, but that these so-called publicists seemed to get shit done. 
Two decades later, I work as a publicist. (And true to the publicist’s word, the building has been lit for Hanukkah every year since).

American Girl Magazine, 1997

My uncle is visiting my grandparents right now and stumbled upon this old American Girl Magazine I was featured in from the ’90s.

When I was about seven years old, I started a letter writing campaign to the Empire State Building asking them to change the lighting scheme to honor Hanukkah. That particular year, Hanukkah was in the beginning of December, but the city landmark was already illuminated red & green in anticipation of Christmas several weeks away.

I thought that was nuts so when I got home I grabbed a gel pen and pitched the building to change it. A polite manager mailed back a response declining the request. Frustrated, I asked my parents who owned the building and wrote another letter, this time up the chain.

About a year later, the owner was caught evading community service for her prior stint evading taxes. She had already been evading my letter for a while, so neither of these pieces of news surprised me. Around that time, however (in what I now assume was an effort to rally positive public opinion), I got a response from a publicist who said the owner was touched and they’d be not only honoring my request that year, but each year forever after. I was even invited to flip the inaugural switch! Within days, news crews were in my living room, outside my school, and inviting me to appear on shows such as Rosie O’Donnell (remember that show?)

The story had transcended the typical news cycle and began trickling into pop culture: I was invited to the Nickelodeon Kid’s Choice Awards, Howard Stern poked fun at me on air (though I was never a guest), and at one point we got a message from a Seinfeld producer saying the story was under consideration to be included in the season’s story line. 

This is probably when I realized not only that there was such a thing as a publicist, but that these so-called publicists seemed to get shit done. 

Two decades later, I work as a publicist. (And true to the publicist’s word, the building has been lit for Hanukkah every year since).

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Anonymous asked: When are you going to update your small girls site - lookin a touch dated?

Ha! I hear ya.  I’m not sure when this question came through but we actually just updated it maybe two weeks ago. Overlaid original design on top of Wix so we can edit at will on the fly, and, accordingly, updated ‘about’ page, clients, and services to reflect current status. 

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How my soft, squishier parts congealed into my work’s foundation

Yesterday I met with a woman from an investment firm who runs communications for a portfolio that includes companies such as ASOS, Facebook, and Nasty Gal.

As the PR director, companies come to her for advice on media relations. The #1 question she receives from them though is, “Which PR firm should we hire?” Accordingly, she’s been putting in the time to connect with firms, and come up with some first-hand recommendations.

In other words, this was more or less a casual interview to see if my business would be the type of outfit she could feel confident recommending to the 100+ household names & upcoming startups her company holds a stake in. No biggie.

About an hour in, she asked if I felt vulnerable or insecure about my being so young and only having had three years of experience in the field. The answer any sane person in this “sales opportunity” would give is, “No. I’m extremely confident about my team and its capabilities! You can trust your companies in my hands!” followed by a pinky promise.

I truly love my job. I like to think I’m good at it. But at the end of the day, I know only being alive for 25 years has not afforded me the luxury of time to be the most experienced in my field. I haven’t worked with a company through to an IPO yet, or held court for a brand through a time of major crisis - there’s vulnerability there, especially when we’re up for consideration against leaders twice our age with teams twice our size. That’s a reality, and it’s not going to change any time soon (unless time magically stops for everyone except me much like any recent Rachel McAdams movie).

So yes, 100% I feel vulnerable. Some days more than others (those are the days where employees have to do a lot of explaining for me). It’s knowing that I don’t know everything that causes me to live by these 4 things:

  • Hire people more experienced & smarter than I am
  • Be clear upfront about anticipated results & capabilities
  • Charge based upon the value I can confidently deliver
  • Work tirelessly

Those are the same 4 things that end up defining the quality of my personal output and in turn, contribute to the character of our company. I’m not so experienced that I can rest easy on my laurels and seniority. The past three years have provided an amazing learning curve and a wide array of industry initiatives to get knee deep in & really own, but even still, I compensate for my lack of time in the trenches by crossing every t, saying yes at every sensible opportunity, and knowing when to assign tasks outside my reach to those better equipped. I know I have to work twice as hard, hire twice as sharply, and be twice as thorough to cement our place in this space. I am not “hungry” for work (there’s no shortage of demand for PR representation right now) but I am “hungry” to constantly prove to myself that I am not letting anyone down - that I am putting client money to its best possible use, and simultaneously providing the best listening ear and delegating hand for my team that I am able.

Vulnerability has led to me to iterating for new approaches, setting clear objectives & expectations upfront, incorporating the ideas and backgrounds of my team, and a myriad of other activities that have made this company stronger.

It’s the soft, malleable parts of my vulnerability that congealed the work foundation I’ve built upon. So am I vulnerable? Yes. Does that mean I’ll put in the time to weigh each option then work my ass off to deliver? Yes to that, too.

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serfnicaragua-deactivated201311 asked: Mallory Blair! yourpalmal was one of the first tumblrs i followed - years ago when i was in nyc - nice to see you are still here! me too, although i have gone through several names:) I attest to your Veterana status, but I suppose your tumblr does the same thing, and with timestamps so TRUMP - hope all is well, love from lala land xoxo sean

It’s amazing to think I joined Tumblr in ‘08 or ‘09 and yes, I’m still here! I hang out far, far more often on twitter.com/yourpalmal but make cameos here and at the Small Girls PR blog, too. :)

Hope all is well in your new city.